News

Honey Show 15 September 2018

The Honey Show created a buzz this year with 165 entries of honey, wax and cookery. Rogate Village Hall was filled with gleaming jars in a range of honey colours from pale and clear to almost black, containing light floral flavours or intense treacle-like scents. Pale wax blocks lay next to rows of cakes and bottles of mead.

Two of our beekeeping trainers, Brad Davis and Graham Rowden, battled it out for the top prizes with Graham taking the Blue Ribbon for best in show. The best exhibit in the novice classes was given to Edith Reitsma for her honey. Alison Turner, who won this prize last year, won three firsts this year, including best shallow frame for extraction (honey filled comb). Pippa Barker won the cup for her mead, Elizabeth Eveleigh won the wax cup and Nicky Easton was presented with the platter for highest points in the cookery classes. Philip Gurney won the Trevor Stubbs Memorial trophy for the highest points in the novice classes. The prizes were presented by Eric Piper, our longest serving member at well over 50 years of beekeeping.

Rogate School produced an impressive display of artwork based on “A bee on a flower”. We had pictures of real honey bees with their three distinct sections, hairy bodies and six legs, and in contrast virtual reality bees in the style of MineCraft computer games. The imagination and creativity made for a lovely display. The first prize went to Wilfred Dryburgh, but the thanks to the whole school.

It has been an interesting year for weather with the cold wet winter and late spring being hard on the bees but the hot summer has released plenty of nectar and pollen to be turned into a good harvest of honey. This lovely warm autumn means that they are still busy, visiting your garden flowers and the ivy on our walls and trees, preparing for the winter to come.

 

Unsung Hero award 2017

We took great pleasure in awarding our new Unsung Hero award to Greg for his sterling work as our Swarm Collection co-ordinator, among other important things. So next time you get a call to collect a swarm of bees, remember to thank Greg (oh, and get your name down ready for the season to come).